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Story: Sep 26, 2014

CIA's Community Works series focuses on socially engaged art...

View details 2014 Faculty Exhibition

CIA Exhibition: Aug 28, 2014

2014 Faculty Exhibition

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Story: Sep 22, 2014

Television and film writer teaching narrative writing at CIA

View details Lunch On Fridays: Haishan Deng

Events: Oct 03, 2014

Lunch On Fridays: Haishan Deng

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Social: a day ago via Facebook

Rachel Lamping '14 won first place and the audience favorite award at the California International Animation Festival 2014 for her 2D animation, "Different Not ...

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Story: Sep 16, 2014

CIA Professor Tina Cassara inspires Sculpture Center exhibit...

View details CIA Portfolio Day

Events: Oct 11, 2014

CIA Portfolio Day

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Story: Aug 27, 2014

New residence hall welcomes first-year students in comfort, ...

View details A Creative Life featuring Paul Yanko

Events: Oct 18, 2014 @ William Busta Gallery in Cleveland, OH

A Creative Life featuring Paul Yanko

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Blog: Sep 30, 2014

Bound by Flesh (2012) trailer

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Story: Aug 18, 2014

CIA again named to "Best in the Midwest" list

View details Unruly Engagements Conference

Events: Nov 06, 2014 @ Cleveland Institute of Art in Cleveland, OH

Unruly Engagements Conference

Academics . Courses

Courses Courses

Advertising Images

Course No. ACD447.1  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Rita Goodman

This course will examine advertisements in the print media with respect to various elements, including: economic and social class; race; ethnic identity; age; gender; and sexuality. The course begins with an introduction to the method of analysis called semiotics, the techniques of which will be used to determine how advertisements convey their messages and how they address themselves to particular consumers. In addition to the elements outlined above, we will discuss several recent controversial issues. While this course will not center on a history of advertising, it will treat the historical place of print advertising in capitalist consumer culture. Interventionist tactics by various artists that attempt to subvert the economic and ideological function of ads will also be examined. Visual Culture Emphasis course. 3 credits.

Aesthetics, Style, and Content

Course No. VAT 300  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Christian Wulffen | William Lorton

Aesthetics Style and Content focuses primarily, on the acquisition of creative and technical skills in the context of the development of original ideas and personal style. Studio work will consist of the practical exploration of the relationship between formal, technical, aesthetic, and stylistic issues relative to the personal, and thematic subjects of the students own choosing. Relative to this, in the seminar portion of the course the students are given critical, theoretical, philosophical background to issues surrounding the subjects of style, aesthetics and content. In the studio the students are encouraged to think of their work as an integrative whole consisting of these various components. In this context they are required to engage in independent critical research on topics relevant to their work. Their research takes the form of both archival and studio work and is presented in both visual and written form. This course is required for all junior students in VATe during their spring semester.

African American Art

Course No. ACD 334  Credits: 3.0

This course covers African American art from the late 1700s to the present emphasizing the formal qualities of art as well as the social and cultural contexts within which it was created. Lectures and assigned readings are drawn from the scholarship of art history, literature, anthropology and history. We examine works by U.S. Artists of African descent and others who engage aspects of African American life and culture. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

American Crafts History

Course No. ACD 376X  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Mark Bassett

This course will necessarily focus on American crafts. However, an effort will be made to incorporate other expressions (especially non-Western) into the mix too. For example, there are readings in Adamson on the Scandinavian slöjd system, Bauhaus aesthetics, the Japanese concept of mingei, the Indian notion of svadharma, the Mande blacksmiths of West Africa, and subversive (feminist) stitchery, in addition to writings by Anni Albers, Karl Marx, Frank Lloyd Wright, Ellen Gates Starr, George Nakashima, Carole Tulloch, Garth Clark, and many more. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

American Vernacular Architecture

Course No. ACD344.1  Credits: 3.0

This class will take a cultural perspective to the architectural and design traditions of the United States. The primary emphasis will be on the domestic environment and its furnishing, though church and civic buildings will play their less part in the story. European antecedents and elite architecture will be included, of course, but we will pay particular attention to the vernacular traditions of various ethnic groups (or cultural regions) and the way in which these traditions adapted and accommodated the above influences, in both architecture and its furnishings. (Based on this historical knowledge, students will have the option of designing housing or other products for recent immigrant groups in the United States.) This course will follow these traditions into the modern world with attention to the development of suburbs as a social phenomenon, and of Craftsman, Prairie, Art Deco and Populous styles (the look and life of America in the '50's and '60's from tailfins and TV dinners to Barbie dolls and fallout shelters, to my own tract house childhood.) Visual Culture Emphasis course. 3 credits.

An Introduction to African Art

Course No. ACD 358  Credits: 3.0
Faculty David Hart | Katherine Flach

This art history course provides an introduction to the visual art traditions of sub-Saharan Africa from ancient cultures to the present. Lectures and readings are drawn from art historical scholarship as well as from other disciplines (anthropology, archaeology, visual culture studies) that provide a sense of the social, political and religious contexts within which the art was created and used. The study of African art from a Western perspective presents questions that are covered in class: When and under what circumstances did “Africa” as a concept emerge? Did Africans consider their works “art” in the same sense that Westerners use that term? How did Western museums acquire African art and how does that inform the way we understand African works? In what ways did colonialism, the spread of Islam and Christianity, pan- Africanism and post-colonial movements affect artistic production? How do we understand modernism in an African context? Fulfills non-Western or cross-cultural art history requirement. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Anatomy for the Artist

Course No. BMA 250  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Elizabeth Halasz

This course is a sophomore elective and is designed to strengthen the students understanding and use of figure anatomy within their work. Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of biomedical art, the course will have two complementary components. These components reflect a multidisciplinary approach to muscular anatomy and figure drawing. Study in this area is designed to provide the student with a good grasp of muscular anatomy as it strongly relates to drawing the figure and its proportions. This course will provide the student the opportunity to interpret anatomy knowledge by working directly from the model and human cadaver from CWRU Anatomy Department This course is designed to provide the student with a solid basic understanding of muscular anatomy as it relates to surface anatomy, proportion and movement of the human figure. The course incorporates lectures on anatomy, figure proportion and drawing techniques linked to direct and accurate observation of the figure model and cadaver model. Offered spring.

Animal Behavior

Course No. BMA 358  Credits: 3.0

Ultimately the success or failure (i.e., life or death) of any individual animal is determined by its behavior. The ability to locate and capture food, avoid being food, acquiring and defending territory, and successfully passing your genes to the next generation, are all dependent on complex interactions between an animal's design, environment and behavior. This course will be an integrative approach emphasizing experimental studies of animal behavior. You will be introduced to state-of-the-art approaches to the study of animal behavior, including neural and hormonal mechanisms, genetic and developmental mechanisms and ecological and evolutionary approaches. We will learn to critique examples of current scientific papers, and learn how to conduct observations and experiments with real animals. We will feature guest appearances by the Curator of Research from the Cleveland MetroPark Zoo, visits to working animal behavior research labs here at CWRU. Group discussions and writing will be emphasized. Cross-registration at CWRU required.

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Community Works

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Uptown Residence Hall

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