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Painting
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Story: Dec 17, 2014

Students animate, illustrate holiday greetings on behalf of ...

View details Fall 2014 Exhibitions

CIA Exhibition: Nov 07, 2014

Fall 2014 Exhibitions

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Story: Nov 15, 2014

Students capture two of the top prizes in museum's surreal d...

View details Spring 2015 Open House

Events: Mar 21, 2015

Spring 2015 Open House

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Cleveland Institute of Art has again received a significant funding commitment from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture to support access to the arts!

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Story: Nov 04, 2014

New CIA building taking shape; set for December completion

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CIA again named to "Best in the Midwest" list

Academics . Painting . Courses

Painting Courses

Painting: Image + Narrative

Course No. PTG 430  Credits: 3.0

This course examines the nature of Painting as it relates to other visual arts media. The source of the "image" and the narrative it suggests will be closely examined. Students will be asked to examine the way an artist goes about making work influences our understanding or read of that work. Alternative painting practices will be examined as well as the approaches of many non-painters. Such artists include: Sol Lewitt, Marcel Duchamp, Survival Research Laboratories, Vito Acconci, Fischli & Weiss, Chuck Close, Alfred Jensen, Jackson Pollock, and Mel Bochner just to name a few. Reading relevant texts, looking at work, research/special projects, studio work, group and individual critiques are an integral part of this course. Open to all students above the freshman level.

Painting: Image + Process

Course No. PTG 428  Credits: 3.0

Figurative', 'abstract', 'conceptual', 'non-objective', 'romantic landscape", "post-modern", "Bob Ross-ian", paintings all have an underlying structure. This studio course examines how the specificity of color, scale, mark and shape form and effect a painting's content. Students will be encouraged to focus on their own body of work while exploring issues of content within the themes of the class through the investigation of their own studio practice, as well as looking at and analyzing the work of other painters and artists throughout history.

Painting: Internship

Course No. PTG 399-499  Credits: 3.0

Students will submit a written proposal for a semester's long course of work. This work should have three primary components: a written paper, studio work, and work in the field (eg.: working for a gallery or artist). A timeline for the completion and review of these components are also required. The proposal must be sponsored by the supervising faculty meaning that the proposal must be vetted and accepted by the faculty who will oversee the project before it is submitted to the department head. This course is open to all Painting majors.

Painting: Mechanics of Meaning: Subject, Form, Content

Course No. PTG 236-336-436  Credits: 3.0

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the criteria, standards, and values promoted by artists and how these come to be understood by their audience through exploring the relationships that exist between subject, form and content. Through discussion, assignments and studio critiques the class will attempt to make explicit the role that our assumptions about the component parts of an art work plays in the construction of a work and how it is understood by its audience.

Painting: The Medium Is the Message

Course No. PTG 234-334-434  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Painting: Painting History: 1828-Present

Careful selection and control of the medium enables us to express ideas clearly. In this class students will explore and consider how various materials, methods, and processes operate, function, and ultimately how they impact meaning. Class demonstrations and lectures will introduce students to basic traditional and nontraditional painting materials and processes including safe handling and use. The class will function as a lab where through the process of trial and error, students will conduct ‘tests,’ keep notes, and ultimately catalogue their findings in an archive. Students are expected to explore these ‘findings’ in their own studio practice, as they further develop the practical and conceptual skills necessary for their work. This course is open to all students with the prerequisite of Intro to Painting or with the permission of the instructor.

Performance Art

Course No. VAT 280-380-480  Credits: 3.0

Performance art is and has been an open genre, a place to experiment with ideas, materials and time. For this course, the working definition of “performance art” is — a piece which uses a live body, exists in time, and is non-linear. This class is an introduction to performance art designed for students who are shy and apprehensive about performing and students who are extroverted and at ease in front of groups. Workshops include: developing a language of movement, gesture, and stance; developing a range of low-tech sound, lighting and video; juxtaposing activity, image, sound and text; structuring or building a piece; and documentation. We will consider singular actions, interventions and other strategies for generating and developing ideas for performance work. Student work for this class has been diverse and has included costume-based work, work using endurance as a central tactic, collaborative work, public intervention, interactive and site-specific work. Skills in editing video and sound, installation, animation are useful, but not required.

Popular Culture + Imagery: A Painting Course

Course No. PTG 227-327-427  Credits: 3.0

This course will explore the symbiotic relationship of art and culture, and the particular ways in which popular and material culture influence the visual arts and vice versa NOW (if there are indeed any particular ways that stand out in this particular time as opposed to a different time in history). Students will learn to discern both the overt and covert affects/effects of culture on contemporary artists as well as Êon their own work and that of their peers. Students in order to take part in relevant class room conversation/discussion need a working knowledge of current events/ history/popular culture and will need to be ready to read and do research, etc. Open to all students.

Role of the Artist as Producer

Course No. VAT 400  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Indra Lacis | Lane Cooper

Contemporary artists have a multitude of ways they can engage with the larger world, beyond the realm of the gallery or museum. Students enrolled in this course will explore various models of artistic production including, but not limited to, performer, activist, curator and provocateur. The relationship between method of creation and idea, or the handmade versus the industrial, will be investigated. Additionally, assignments will challenge students to analyze the content of their artwork within local, national, and global contexts. Coursework will include studio work, readings, discussion, and critiques. Required for VAT seniors in all majors. Open as an elective with approval of instructor. Offered fall.

Meet Your Professors view all

Daniel Tranberg

Daniel Tranberg

Lecturer

Dan Tranberg has published more than 750 articles on art and has exhibited his paintings in more that 40 exhib...more

Cores + Connections

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While at CIA, you'll learn from the masters through our rigorous, world-class curriculum and connect with working professionals to begin your career.

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Cores + Connections

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