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Academics . Liberal Arts . Courses

Liberal Arts Courses

Cinematic Time after 1960

Course No. ACD 320X  Credits: 3.0

What does a cinematic image of time look like? Why did this question suddenly seem pressing after the Second World War? How has cinematic time been explored by filmmakers and artists in the past 50 years? What possibilities does this exploration open up? These questions will guide our investigation of cinematic time since 1960. We will consider a wide range of films and moving image media in which time takes on strange qualities—where the emphasis is on what is happening in the image, rather than on what has happened or will happen in the next shot. $25 course fee required.

Conceptual Art

Course No. ACD 483X  Credits: 3.0

This theme-based art history course is designed to give students an in-depth, semester-long investigation into the art movements and ideas that informed Conceptual ArtÕs development in the 1960s and 1970s as well as its impact on contemporary art making in the decades that followed. This course will cover, but not be limited to, the so-called heyday of Conceptual Art in the 1960s and 1970s, a focus on which would otherwise reinforce the traditional modernist art historical framework that defined styles in part by limiting them to a specific time period. Significant time in the class will be devoted to investigating examples of conceptually-informed art created in the 1980s, 1990s and the early 21st century, underscoring the impact of Conceptual ArtÕs legacy for art, craft and design today. The course will investigate the philosophies that informed conceptual art that allowed artists to problematize the conditions and encounters with art; the conventions of its visuality, and the circumstances of its production. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Contemporary African + African American Literature

Course No. LLC 359  Credits: 3.0

Today a good deal of Third-World literature in particular expressed in many vital respects postmodern historical awareness of the parmountcy of the power relations hidden behind political, economic and social institutions and structures both nationally and internationally. With particular emphasis on political economy, this course will examine how this literature re-contextualizes such critical sociological questions as: What's traditionalism? What's modernization? The African-American texts highlight African-American socio-economic challenges today, dating back to Emancipation/Reconstruction, alongside their efforts at socio-cultural self-definitions. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

Creative Writing

Course No. LLC 393  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Shelley Bloomfield Costa | Susan Grimm

This course will give students the opportunity to explore the three essential genres of creative writing in a practicum setting. Study and practice will center on basic analytic methods for reading and basic inventive methods for writing short fiction, poetry, and dramatic narratives. Course assignments will include exercises in writing the short story, including the short graphic narrative; various poetic forms such as the sonnet, the villanelle, and the free verse poem; and variants of the short dramatic narrative such as the screen treatment, the story board, and the short film script. Creative Writing can be taken to satisfy either required Junior/Senior Writing-Intensive credit or Open Elective Liberal Arts credit. It will allow students who are planning visual arts careers involving writing (i.e., illustration, film, and video) to develop the basic critical and writing performance skills necessary for their professional advancement. Students who may be considering the Creative Writing Concentration program are strongly urged to take this course during their Sophomore year. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

Creative Writing Concentration: Body of Work

Course No. LLC 415  Credits: 1.5

Required of seniors pursuing the Creative Writing Concentration. Not open as an elective. Fall and spring semesters required. 1.5 credits each semester.

Creative Writing Concentration: Body of Work Continuation

Course No. LLC 415C  Credits: 1.5

Required of seniors pursuing the Creative Writing Concentration. Not open as an elective. Fall and spring semesters required. 1.5 credits each semester.

Creative Writing Workshop: Dialogue + Story

Course No. LLC 391  Credits: 3.0

In this course, we concentrate first on writing dialogues, looking at the ways in which conversation establishes character, creates and resolves conflict, and advances plot. We'll see how these dialogues "play" first when we stage them, and then we put them back on the page and wrap stories around them. In-class, team-writing exercises are designed to jump start your ideas and provide our working material. We'll also take a look at excerpts from narratives by master storytellers, experiment with re-telling the story just through dialogue, and see how these artistic choices inevitably shape the content itself. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

Creativity + Taoism

Course No. HCS 300  Credits: 3.0

This interdisciplinary course explores the ground from which, in the Chinese Taoist philosophic view, all great creativity springs. The purpose is two-fold: first, to investigate and achieve an understanding of the Taoist world view through readings of primary texts such as the "Tao Te Ching" and the "Chuangtzu," and selected works from the Ch'an (Zen) tradition. Second, we proceed to examine the Taoist and Ch'an perceptions are applied to and affect the creation of the art object in traditional China, primarily represented by selections from Chinese poetry. Appropriate attention will also be paid to intended relationships between painting and poetry, occurring when poems are inscribed directly on paintings to create an aesthetic whole. Here the notion that "visual" and "literary" experiences are somehow mutually exclusive will be challenged. We read such poets as T'so Ch'ien, Wang Wei, Su Tung-p'o and Han Shan, and we look at paintings by such artists as Mu Ch'i, Mi Fei, Shih T'ao and Ni Tsan. Students are encouraged to connect and contrast Taoist assumptions and themes with their own knowledge and experiences as developing artists. May be applied as Creative Writing Concentration course.

It's not too late to apply

It's not too late to apply

Get started here.

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Nancy McEntee

Professor/Chair of Photography + Video

Nancy McEntee is a Professor of Photography and Chair of the Photography + Video department at the Cleveland I...more

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