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Academics . Jewelry + Metals . Courses

Jewelry + Metals Courses

Jewelry + Metals: BFA Statement/Exhibition

Course No. MET450M  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Kathy Buszkiewicz | Matthew Hollern

The seminar is designed to focus on the changing landscape of art, where we will examine concepts and technologies of the field, and pursue work of individual direction. Advanced studio technologies and computer applications will supplement the course to challenge conceptual growth, facilitate design, and present new means of fabrication. Subjects are presented to challenge students to conduct research and examine their own position. Discussions and presentations vary to recognize the direction of the group and include singular object-driven problems, formal issues, and conceptual challenges. The course includes larger group discussion with all majors, demonstrations to support individual directions, visiting artists, field trips and presentations. The completion of work and preparation for the presentation of the BFA Exhibition will take place. Required of 4th year graduating Jewelry + Metals majors.

Jewelry + Metals: Casting

Course No. MET268/368/468  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Matthew Hollern

As a basic technology in the jewelry and metals field, casting provides the opportunity to explore complex and dynamic form, surface and texture, the organic and geometric language. Technologies and materials from ancient to the cutting edge provide new and exciting possibilities for models, molds, parts. The course will address concepts and technologies of basic waxwork and model making, CAD/CAM, and casting processes to challenge students to apply new techniques and technologies to create work that remains unique to their direction. From fundamental wax carving and found objects to 3D modeling and output to the Solidscape™ 3D wax printer and the CNC milling machine, the course will cultivate new skills and opportunities for the creation of new work. Vacuum, centrifugal, gravity, and rubber mold casting are addressed to provide a range of opportunities for tangible objects. A wide variety of metals, plastic resins, and rubber provide endless possibilities. Readings, essays, and discussion offer the integrated seminar experience. Visiting artists, field trips, and presentations will supplement the activity in the department. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives.

Jewelry + Metals: Casting + Modeling

Course No. MET267/367/467  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Matthew Hollern

Casting and Modeling is a hybrid course designed to address the connection of modeling and casting. As a basic technology in the jewelry and metals field, casting provides the opportunity to explore complex form, surface and texture, dynamic change of plane and line, and everything from organic to geometric aesthetic. Modeling ranges from carving, sculpting, fabrication, and direct casting of organic objects and materials, to CAD models and molds made in the department through machining and 3D printing. Students experience three different casting methods: gravity, centrifugal, and vacuum, all of which provide unique opportunities to create jewelry, objects, and small sculpture. Jewelry and metalworking techniques are presented to complement the current level and experience of the group. Independent work is encouraged. Readings, essays, and discussion offer the integrated seminar experience. Visiting artists, historical and contemporary examples, field trips, and presentations supplement the class. Open to Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives.

Jewelry + Metals: Ceremony + Ritual

Course No. MET261/361/461  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Kathy Buszkiewicz

Consider the importance of the objects we use in specialized events, ceremonies, and our daily rituals. How does ceremony and ritual fit into the context of the 21st century and our society? We explore historic and worldwide references to ceremonial and ritual objects through the slide presentations, videos, and actual works. Students create objects based on individual exploration and interest relevant to the subject. Additional independent work is also required. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives.

Jewelry + Metals: Color

Course No. MET260/360/460  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Gretchen Goss

The use of color in jewelry and metals presents great possibilities. This course will explore a range of approaches to the use of color and colored materials in the creation of jewelry, functional objects, and small sculpture. Beyond the classic greens and browns, we will develop and apply chemical patinas to produce a range of effects in colors and patterns. In aluminum, the electro-chemical process of anodization will allow pigment dyes to be deposited in the surface of the metal. Plastics will be presented to allow for fabrication with stock materials, casting of resins and polymers, and laminations. Other pigments such as colored-pencils, paints, and powder coating are also addressed. Extensive samples and slides supplement the course. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives.

Jewelry + Metals: Fabrication

Course No. MET206/306/406  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Jewelry and Metals

Emphasis in the studio will be placed on fabrication techniques, from pattern work to cold connection, soldering on a varied scale and hollow construction. Students will also work in a small public space (the showcase) to explore "exhibition" or "installation." Independent work is encouraged. Visiting artists, field trips, and slide presentations supplement the class. Open to Jewelry and Metals majors and all electives. Prerequisite: MET249 Introduction to Jewelry + Metals.

Jewelry + Metals: Flatware

Course No. MET266/366/466  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Jewelry and Metals

Flatware is an exploration of utensils for preparing, serving, and eating food. Emphasis is placed on function, related concepts, and use of materials. Independent work is also encouraged. This is an intermediate and advanced level course designed to challenge students’ conceptual and design skills. The exploration of advanced studio processes will be encouraged to help facilitate the projects’ design and fabrication. Problems are presented to challenge all levels of students. Visiting artists, field trips, and slide presentations supplement the class. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors all electives. Prerequisites: MET249 Introduction to Jewelry + Metals.

Jewelry + Metals: Forming + Fabrication

Course No. MET259/359/459  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Matthew Hollern

This course is designed to develop skills in forming nonferrous metal through the various metalsmithing processes of raising, stretching, seaming, snarling, crimping, and pitch work used to create volumetric forms for functional and nonfunctional objects as well as jewelry. Problems are presented to challenge all levels of students, recognize the direction of the group and include singular object-driven problems, along with discussion of formal and conceptual issues. Presentations, visiting artists, slides, and actual objects supplement the course. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives.

Meet Your Professors view all

Kathy Buszkiewicz kathybuszkiewiczart01.jpgkathybuszkiewiczart02.jpg

Kathy Buszkiewicz

Professor

Kathy Buszkiewicz has exhibited throughout the world, and her work is represented in many collections. She tra...more

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